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Is it really worth injecting vitamins?

This article was taken from: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-47803286

By 

There is a growing trend for intravenous “vitamin” drips – but what are the risks? And do they even work?

Last month, a 51-year-old woman from Hunan, China, nearly died after blending 20 different fruits to create a homemade intravenous (IV) drip. She thought vitamins from the fresh fruit would benefit her health.

Instead, she developed a fever and itchiness, and was taken into intensive care with multiple organ damage. After dialysis, and several rounds of antibiotics, she is now recovering.

This is an extreme example, but she may have been inspired by the growing trend for IV in which vitamins and other substances are administered directly into the blood.

The practice is very popular in Asia where IV drips are offered in beauty salons, often by unlicensed and unqualified practitioners.

Those promoting vitamin IV drips claim they can boost energy, strengthen the immune system, improve skin, cure hangovers, burn fat, fight jet lag, and cure a myriad of other minor ailments.

In the US, a bus will even come to your house to offer infusions as part of a party package, to “cure” hangovers.

Treatments can be very expensive, costing anything from £120 to £3,000 in one London clinic.

Celebrities such as Miley Cyrus, Cara Delevingne and Chrissy Teigen have taken part in the growing trend, posting images of themselves on social media hooked up to IV bags.